Lionir [he/him]

About me on lionir.ca

  • 46 Posts
  • 558 Comments
Joined 2 years ago
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Cake day: January 29th, 2022

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  • It sounds like you are more concerned with the matrix.org homeserver than matrix itself.

    No. The foundation also has massive influence in how the clients and protocol develop. These tools that I’m talking about are not built-in for matrix, they’re largely exclusive to instance admins through mjolnir or require the usage of bots. This is not a good state of affairs.

    Matrix.org homeserver will eventually go away for personal use, this is the plan for the future.

    I don’t believe this is true. I’ve never read such a thing.

    The bullet points you listed are all currently able to be realized on any self-hosted homeserver.

    Not every room or space will be hosted by someone self-hosting their server. I find it kind of appalling that this would be the solution. It’s certainly not what I’ve heard from people working on projects around moderation.



  • I’ve personally heard that Mjolnir works not great when it comes to admin things but the biggest problem that I’m aware is that Mjolnir does not really solve the problem for individuals with their rooms and spaces to moderate. I believe Draupnir (https://github.com/the-draupnir-project/Draupnir) is trying to help with this particular flaw with Mjolnir.

    One of the other things in terms of T&S is that it is my understanding that the team is too small and the tooling to handle the reports of abuse on matrix.org are not good enough.

    As for mod tools more concretely, I think that people who are admins of rooms or spaces should have the following abilities:

    • Clearer moderation roles
    • More interaction between permissions in rooms and spaces
    • Filters for slurs
    • Blocking homeservers (in case of abuse)
    • Reports that actually go to them

    It should be noted that I’m not very familiar with the tools on matrix as I largely have little trust in my ability to moderate there.



  • I’ve spent a lot of time trying to evangelize Lemmy on reddit, and one of the most common criticisms is the possibility of defederation and getting cut off from major communities.

    Frankly, if this is a concern to people and I believe it does concern some, they should not use federated platforms as this will always happen.

    We know that Lemmy slowly bled tens of thousands of users in the months following the reddit API exodus as users drifted back to reddit. Although it’s impossible to know how many of those users were annoyed by the defederation drama, I think it’s safe to say that the number wasn’t zero.

    The steep decline in active users on Beehaw in the months following the decision is probably the best source of hard evidence supporting my claim.

    You’re saying that the decline in active users on Beehaw is a result of these defederations while simultaneously acknowledging that Lemmy as a whole lost users. Maybe it is true, maybe it is not. I could not make such a claim with this information.





  • My personal opinion on this is that we should probably take an allowlist approach to federation to be able to be more proactive about instances that could be threats for Beehaw.

    I think we’ve managed to keep our culture to some degree through stronger moderation when it comes to out-of-instance users and making use of defederations.

    That said, I wish we had more flexible federation options, such as for example, letting our users interact with certain instances without letting people from those instances interact in ours.





  • It’s a basic curl command, that shouldn’t be “arcane” if you’re setting up a server.

    This is the equivalent of saying that any instance admin needs to know how to use curl while most people have never used a commandline. Not only that but you need machine access to know the api key which I would wager instance admins do not necessarily have.

    I think this is the result of not prioritising work that makes moderation possible by non-technically inclined people and it is genuinely a failure of the system.

    The priorities of development on Lemmy are decided by developers and the people who are not are simply pushed away. Most community leaders and moderators are not developers. The mental gymnastics to justify this lack of tooling is tiring.